Spencer

Designer
Atlanta, GA
$ 89.00
/ hour
Portfolio
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Bio

Spencer Linton is a graphic designer born and raised in Atlanta, GA. Being the daughter of a PhD-mother and a high-school-dropout-father, she spent most of her life impatiently and rebelliously challenging her schooling. In 2018 she graduated early from The University of Georgia with a BFA in Advertising and immediately after she joined The Creative Circus's graphic design program, eventually dropping out in 2020 to devise a more fulfilling education. After dropping out, she spent 6 months in isolation remaking her portfolio from the ground up and acting as her own project manager, critic, cheerleader, and teacher. Eventually, she hit a point of stasis and began hunting for her avenue for growth. Now she is in pursuit of a team of creatives to work with and teach her what she can't teach herself. Apart from finding a rewarding full-time job, you can find her reading a book a week, making homemade pasta, seizing deeper conversations, and planning her next move to New York. Her career goal is to be a design renaissance woman and her life goal is to be truly and deeply happy.

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Work Experience
Fitzco
Design Intern
01/21-now
Atlanta, GA
Bureau Christopher Knowles
Design Intern
01/20-04/20
Atlanta, GA
Subway Book Review
Design Intern
01/21-now
Atlanta, GA
University

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The rich text element allows you to create and format headings, paragraphs, blockquotes, images, and video all in one place instead of having to add and format them individually. Just double-click and easily create content.

Static and dynamic content editing

A rich text element can be used with static or dynamic content. For static content, just drop it into any page and begin editing. For dynamic content, add a rich text field to any collection and then connect a rich text element to that field in the settings panel. Voila!

How to customize formatting for each rich text

Headings, paragraphs, blockquotes, figures, images, and figure captions can all be styled after a class is added to the rich text element using the "When inside of" nested selector system.

Skills

Skills: Branding, motion graphics (AE + C4D), illustration, typography, art direction, strategy, consideration, patience, curiosity, and drive.Awards: D&AD New Blood- Wood Pencil; GSD&M Bonnaroo Rebrand- Gold; Center Ring Student Awards- Gold (Motion, Experiential Advertising), Silver (Posters), Merit (Advertising, Illustration)

Featured work
Tell us why you're the best applicant in under 50 words

I won't use my title as my crutch. It's great to be a designer, but it's just as important to be a conversationalist, leader, follower, friend, doer, and thinker. I can leave my preconceived notions behind and enter with vulnerability and the readiness to grow.

Give us your bio in under 500 words

Spencer Linton is a graphic designer born and raised in Atlanta, GA. Being the daughter of a PhD-mother and a high-school-dropout-father, she spent most of her life impatiently and rebelliously challenging her schooling. In 2018 she graduated early from The University of Georgia with a BFA in Advertising and immediately after she joined The Creative Circus's graphic design program, eventually dropping out in 2020 to devise a more fulfilling education. After dropping out, she spent 6 months in isolation remaking her portfolio from the ground up and acting as her own project manager, critic, cheerleader, and teacher. Eventually, she hit a point of stasis and began hunting for her avenue for growth. Now she is in pursuit of a team of creatives to work with and teach her what she can't teach herself. Apart from finding a rewarding full-time job, you can find her reading a book a week, making homemade pasta, seizing deeper conversations, and planning her next move to New York. Her career goal is to be a design renaissance woman and her life goal is to be truly and deeply happy.

1. What's the most courageous thing you've ever done?

I think the most honest answer is I've rebuilt a relationship with my father. My dad has struggled with bipolar disorder and alcoholism for as long as I remember, and our relationship used to be quite tumultuous. After my parents divorced, my brother and I spent every other weekend with my dad. The weekends where my brother was around were lighter, full of movies, junk food, and roaming Atlanta. Periodically my dad lashed out, bruised by the sudden stripping of his full-time-dad position, but generally, my brother acted as a shield from it. But he grew tired of being that shield. He slowed stopped seeing our dad and eventually stopped talking to him at all. Then it was just the two of us. Even at about ten years old, I often felt I was the adult and he was the child. My dad would throw temper tantrums and I would stay up cleaning up the mess. He would cry and I would console him. He would tell me how awful I was, how I didn't love him enough, and I would listen without disdain. I was trying to make up for his lost son, his lost marriage, his lost pride. I knew it was growing pains and mental instability lashing out, but I became emotionally exhausted. I wanted so badly to have a "normal" life, to focus on middle school and carry on without thinking about his wellbeing. Instead, I spent most of my weekends keeping him from killing himself and rationalizing what was going on. At 15 or so I burnt out. I stopped talking to my dad, stopped being vulnerable with others, and stopped caring. Radio silence. Admittedly, it was a nice break in some ways. I was able to be at peace with myself and see what "normal" meant in some fashions. But it couldn't last, after everything was said and done, after I slowly regained my mental health and tapped back into myself and my friendships, the guilt ate me alive. Because I had seen it from the inside— the human condition. When everyone was gone, his money was shot, and his kids and partner abandoned him, I saw him. My dad. No walls, no ego, no boundaries. I saw a shell of a man and learned the value of relationships, of truth, of love. I learned what it meant to be a daughter and what it meant to be vulnerable. The good and the bad. I finally saw my dad as a human, not a figure. So, I went back. I set boundaries, had hard conversations, cried a lot, went to therapy, opened up more and more, and found what made me happy, not just him. It took a lot of patience (it still does), but our relationship has never been stronger than it is today. I wish I could change many things and the pressure still weighs on me, but I also realize that our relationship has made me the way I am. Thoughtful, persistent, innovative, and selfless. A daughter. All in all, I think rebuilding my relationship with my father has been my most courageous act.

2. How are creativity and innovation related?

If creativity is a square, then innovation is a rectangle. Creativity entails both innovation and banality, flowing between groundbreaking designs to redundant wine-and-paint classes. It is both a square (creative) and a rectangle (innovative). But if you've never held a paintbrush, never studied a scene, then every movement requires new methods at Sip-&-Strokes. Thus a square is also a rectangle. I believe all creativity is innovative, but to what degree is determined by the one judging.

3. Why do companies need clarity and creativity?

Creativity is wonderful. It can fuel passions, energize curiosity, and rebuild our lives for the better. But creativity without clarity can do the opposite. It can muddle thinking, overwhelm emotions, and stifle discovery. I believe brands need creativity to push forward our communities and challenge what already exists, but must be backed by clarity in order to relay those ideas in ways that speaks to the many, not the few.

4. You have 30 minutes of free time. What do you do with it?

Ideally, I read, walk in the sun, and catch up with someone I love. Realistically, sometimes I scroll through social media, end up feeling disconnected, and take a nap instead. So, typically I balance the two and pick whatever feels healthy for me at the moment. Slowly I'm rebuilding my habits.

5. What is one risky and bold goal in life you have? Or, if you could dedicate your life to solving one problem, what would it be?

I would love to solve the problem of miscommunication. We spend an uncomfortable amount of our lives not saying what we mean, misunderstanding those around us, and generally feeling disconnected. Say what you want, but life comes down to our relationships with others and our self-worth, so I think solving even a fraction of the miscommunication process could save us all a lot of grief and loss.

6. Explain your creative process

I've found my creative process is more scientific than artistic. I research, define variables and objectives, develop visual hypotheses, remove bias, clarify, test said hypotheses, eliminate inefficiencies, refine, and put my work out in the world for others to explore and rework. If all goes well, I produce work that pushes forward human thinking and teaches us about ourselves and our world.

7. What is the best advice that you have been given?

"Be impatient about easy explanations. Teach that part of the mind that wants to know everything not to begin questions it cannot answer." Life is made to be questioned, restructured, and (if you do it right) enjoyed. Easy answers and quick solves rarely get you to your final form, but tireless self-reflection can't force you there either. Strike balance.

8. What is your definition of creativity?

Undergoing something that mentally or physically challenges you to rethink your patterns/biases and experience something anew.

9. What 10 songs are on your favorite playlist right now?

Livin' Thing (ELO) Chaos (Miki Fiki) What We Drew 우리가 그려왔 (Yaeji) All The Time (Bahamas) Blue Monday (New Order) This Must Be The Place (Kishi Bashi) MONTERO (Lil Nas X) Hunnybee (Unknown Mortal Orchestra) Tú (Maye) Dark Days (Local Natives)

10. How do you want people to remember you?

As being authentically myself without ego, judgment, or shame.

Have you been convicted of a crime and/or a felony? If so, what was the offense? State the city, country, and date.

Heading

You should select me because

I won't use my title as my crutch. It's great to be a designer, but it's just as important to be a conversationalist, leader, follower, friend, doer, and thinker. I can leave my preconceived notions behind and enter with vulnerability and the readiness to grow.

Why are you interested in this opportunity?

What are you looking to gain from an opportunity like this?

What would be your goals after completing this engagement?

4. How did you hear about wgi?

Share an example of a time you were most motivated and a time you were most demotivated.

In your opinion, what creates a great culture at a company?

What brands and companies do you admire and why?

What do you do to stay sharp and improve your craft?

What’s your favorite quote?

10. If you could solve one problem in the world what would it be?

Bio

Spencer Linton is a graphic designer born and raised in Atlanta, GA. Being the daughter of a PhD-mother and a high-school-dropout-father, she spent most of her life impatiently and rebelliously challenging her schooling. In 2018 she graduated early from The University of Georgia with a BFA in Advertising and immediately after she joined The Creative Circus's graphic design program, eventually dropping out in 2020 to devise a more fulfilling education. After dropping out, she spent 6 months in isolation remaking her portfolio from the ground up and acting as her own project manager, critic, cheerleader, and teacher. Eventually, she hit a point of stasis and began hunting for her avenue for growth. Now she is in pursuit of a team of creatives to work with and teach her what she can't teach herself. Apart from finding a rewarding full-time job, you can find her reading a book a week, making homemade pasta, seizing deeper conversations, and planning her next move to New York. Her career goal is to be a design renaissance woman and her life goal is to be truly and deeply happy.

You should pick me becuase

I won't use my title as my crutch. It's great to be a designer, but it's just as important to be a conversationalist, leader, follower, friend, doer, and thinker. I can leave my preconceived notions behind and enter with vulnerability and the readiness to grow.

Why are you interested in this opportunity?

What are you looking to gain from an opportunity like this?

What would be your goals after completing this engagement?

4. How did you hear about wgi?

Share an example of a time you were most motivated and a time you were most demotivated.

In your opinion, what creates a great culture at a company?

What brands and companies do you admire and why?

What do you do to stay sharp and improve your craft?

What’s your favorite quote?

10. If you could solve one problem in the world what would it be?

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