Clare

Visual Designer
Brooklyn, NY
$ 57.00
/ hour
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Bio

I am a recent Parsons School of Design grad originally from Portland, Oregon currently living in Brooklyn, New York. I have spent the last four years designing every type of publication you can imagine: books, zines, magazines, flipbooks, letterpress poems, type specimens, and more. After learning about important book designers such as Irma Boom and Paul Soulellis (my personal heroes!), I became interested in the idea of experimental publishing and expanding my own idea of what a book can be. There are no rules! My mom is a textile artist and always encouraged my love of making when I was a kid. We lived by the philosophy, “If you can make it, you shouldn’t buy it.” I wore a lot of handmade clothes and ate a lot of home cooked meals when I was little, which I used to think was embarrassing, but I’m so proud of it now. While design takes up a large part of my life, I always find the time to cook. If I’m not at my desk designing books, there’s a pretty big chance I’m in the kitchen trying out a new recipe (last week I made squid for the first time!) And if I’m not at home, you can guarantee I’m in upstate New York in the woods somewhere. There is a running joke between my friends and I that I would pick up and move anywhere without a second thought; I am notorious for planning last minute solo trips and truly could not imagine myself staying in one place for the rest of my life.

Quick links
Work Experience
Dovetail Press
Editorial + Design Intern
Sept. 2018 — May 2019
W.W. Norton
Editorial Intern
Apr. 2018 — Aug. 2018
The New School
Blogger + Social Media Editor
Sept. 2018 — May 2019
University

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Skills
Featured work
You should pick me becuase

In a world where everyone seems to be an interdisciplinary designer, I have chosen to hurl myself full throttle at the traditional craft of bookmaking. There is something so beautiful to me about the ephemerality of printed matter, especially publications. There is an urgency with which I design, and I feel like most print designers likely feel this way, since we are constantly tasked with the weight and pressure of “keeping print alive.” WGI is perfect for me right now at this time in my life. I am fresh out of school and ready to immerse myself into the world around me. I am energetic, I am resilient, I am curious, I am scared, I am vulnerable, I am open, I am restless, and I am ready for the World’s Greatest Internship.

Why are you interested in this opportunity?

What are you looking to gain from an opportunity like this?

After WGI, I would love to participate in a fellowship or residency, focusing on maybe one niche or unique aspect of the publishing or graphic design industry. I also would really like to gain experience in a print shop or learn some sort of trade that would complement my book design process and allow me to produce my own publications. I am extremely interested in getting better at printing using a risograph machine and bookbinding by hand! A long-term goal of mine is to start tabling at book fairs such as the NY, SF, and LA art book fairs. I think this relates to my desire to foster more of a community, and actively participating in the design community by working at art book fairs is such a great way to do this, in my opinion. I would also love to start the Kippenberger challenge, which is a self-declaration to make 7.45 books in one calendar year. There is no prize or incentive for this challenge, other than to practice bookmaking.

What would be your goals after completing this engagement?

4. How did you hear about wgi?

Share an example of a time you were most motivated and a time you were most demotivated.

At my most recent internship, I operated as the third of a small three-person publishing startup, which meant that a lot of work often got shifted to my plate when both of my bosses had larger projects to tackle. I enjoyed this position because I was able to step up and fill in the gaps of the workload for the company. When people depend on me, I feel most motivated. It’s almost as if when all the weight of the world is on my shoulders, that’s when it’s easiest for me to lift. I was especially motivated in these circumstances at my last internship because neither of my bosses were designers (they were editors), so I became the sole design help for their tasks. I loved leading my tiny team to victory. On the flip side, last spring I got a pretty gnarly concussion that left me with a load of side effects and practically no motivation due to the physical and mental challenges that this concussion presented. Staring at a computer screen for longer than 20 minutes became painful, which made designing anything or even answering emails difficult. I dealt with splitting headaches every moment from waking up to falling asleep. During the healing process, which took almost 6 months, I turned heavily to analog processes of designing and functioning in my everyday life. While I got better at more hands-on tasks like letterpress printing, cooking, and collaging (the bright side), healing from a concussion was still one of the most demotivating and demoralizing things I’ve had to go through to this day.

In your opinion, what creates a great culture at a company?

My most recent internship was at a startup and what I really loved about working there was the willingness to collaborate across teams. The sales team would reach out to the production team who would reach out to the design team, all to collaborate and create a custom product for a client. This ensured that everyone knew each other’s names, felt comfortable reaching out to someone who wasn’t on their immediate team, and kept a constant dialogue flowing within the office. I also resonate with companies that foster the growth of their employees outside of the workplace, whether that be by sponsoring continuing education programs, encouraging their employees to take workshops, or hosting events outside of work time. Great culture starts from within, often by constant collaboration, and extends outside of the office and work hours.

What brands and companies do you admire and why?

Patagonia is the first company that immediately came to mind when I thought of companies that I admire. Maybe this is because I’m from Oregon and grew up basically in the forest, but Patagonia has been doing sustainability way before sustainability was a buzzword. An even bigger buzzword than sustainability is authenticity, and Patagonia is an authentic brand in my eyes. The same messages and processes that they stood by in the 1990s are the same that they stand by in 2019 and that’s honorable to me. A modern-day company that I believe is also trying to achieve this is Everlane. Everlane is a trend-setting company in that they have started an important conversation surrounding transparency that has led other brands to follow suit. This topic definitely was not as prevalent when I was growing up, and it’s crazy to think that the current generation will grow up in a time where topics such as sustainability, authenticity, and transparency are at the forefront.

What do you do to stay sharp and improve your craft?

I am a firm believer in consuming whatever you want to be good at. Musicians should listen to a lot of music, dancers should attend a lot of dance performances, filmmakers should watch a lot of movies. While of course I studied graphic design in school and spent my academic life in classes all day designing books and honing that craft, my professional life was spent at editorial internships and publishing companies, learning what school couldn’t teach me about books and book design. In my free time, I visit bookstores, not only because I really like to read, but because I wanted to familiarize myself with book designers and publishing companies that I had never heard of. To say my whole life revolves around books would be an understatement! I cannot stop consuming books in every form, and I believe this makes me a good book designer. I also jump at any opportunity to help a friend, even if they can’t pay me, if it means I can practice design. I’ve designed promotional posters for drag queen friends, calligraphed envelopes for a friend’s sister’s wedding, and created business cards for a classmate trying to find a job.

What’s your favorite quote?

A quote that I really love is, “You don’t start out a project to create a failure or success.” This was said in an interview with Irma Boom and I resonate with it for a number of reasons. To me, this is the less cheesy version of the “life is a journey, not a destination” quote. While being result or outcome-focused might get you to the destination faster, what is there really to learn from a process based on this ideal? I have learned to embrace my absolute flops as much as I embrace my triumphs. A few years ago, I began a really difficult coding project that I absolutely did not have the skill or knowledge to ever complete, which I knew before even starting it. But, my professor at the time gave me no other option and I was forced (lovingly) to “complete” the project without cutting corners. As you’ve probably guessed, I wasn’t able to finish the project, and ended up troubleshooting the same few lines of code for over a week with no success. I remember being so bummed out; I let my teacher down, I didn’t have a completed website to show to the class or upload to my portfolio, and it was driving me insane that I never did figure out how to fix the code problem that I kept running into. But when I look back on this project, what I can see now is all the skills that I DID learn, and how much better I got at coding even if I didn’t master the skill I set out to master. Just like Irma Boom said, I definitely didn’t set out to create failure or success with this project. What I gained from this wasn’t as concrete as a “failure” or “success,” but, organically, a better understanding of code and also my own willpower.

10. If you could solve one problem in the world what would it be?

You should select me because

In a world where everyone seems to be an interdisciplinary designer, I have chosen to hurl myself full throttle at the traditional craft of bookmaking. There is something so beautiful to me about the ephemerality of printed matter, especially publications. There is an urgency with which I design, and I feel like most print designers likely feel this way, since we are constantly tasked with the weight and pressure of “keeping print alive.” WGI is perfect for me right now at this time in my life. I am fresh out of school and ready to immerse myself into the world around me. I am energetic, I am resilient, I am curious, I am scared, I am vulnerable, I am open, I am restless, and I am ready for the World’s Greatest Internship.

Why are you interested in this opportunity?

What are you looking to gain from an opportunity like this?

After WGI, I would love to participate in a fellowship or residency, focusing on maybe one niche or unique aspect of the publishing or graphic design industry. I also would really like to gain experience in a print shop or learn some sort of trade that would complement my book design process and allow me to produce my own publications. I am extremely interested in getting better at printing using a risograph machine and bookbinding by hand! A long-term goal of mine is to start tabling at book fairs such as the NY, SF, and LA art book fairs. I think this relates to my desire to foster more of a community, and actively participating in the design community by working at art book fairs is such a great way to do this, in my opinion. I would also love to start the Kippenberger challenge, which is a self-declaration to make 7.45 books in one calendar year. There is no prize or incentive for this challenge, other than to practice bookmaking.

What would be your goals after completing this engagement?

4. How did you hear about wgi?

Share an example of a time you were most motivated and a time you were most demotivated.

At my most recent internship, I operated as the third of a small three-person publishing startup, which meant that a lot of work often got shifted to my plate when both of my bosses had larger projects to tackle. I enjoyed this position because I was able to step up and fill in the gaps of the workload for the company. When people depend on me, I feel most motivated. It’s almost as if when all the weight of the world is on my shoulders, that’s when it’s easiest for me to lift. I was especially motivated in these circumstances at my last internship because neither of my bosses were designers (they were editors), so I became the sole design help for their tasks. I loved leading my tiny team to victory. On the flip side, last spring I got a pretty gnarly concussion that left me with a load of side effects and practically no motivation due to the physical and mental challenges that this concussion presented. Staring at a computer screen for longer than 20 minutes became painful, which made designing anything or even answering emails difficult. I dealt with splitting headaches every moment from waking up to falling asleep. During the healing process, which took almost 6 months, I turned heavily to analog processes of designing and functioning in my everyday life. While I got better at more hands-on tasks like letterpress printing, cooking, and collaging (the bright side), healing from a concussion was still one of the most demotivating and demoralizing things I’ve had to go through to this day.

In your opinion, what creates a great culture at a company?

My most recent internship was at a startup and what I really loved about working there was the willingness to collaborate across teams. The sales team would reach out to the production team who would reach out to the design team, all to collaborate and create a custom product for a client. This ensured that everyone knew each other’s names, felt comfortable reaching out to someone who wasn’t on their immediate team, and kept a constant dialogue flowing within the office. I also resonate with companies that foster the growth of their employees outside of the workplace, whether that be by sponsoring continuing education programs, encouraging their employees to take workshops, or hosting events outside of work time. Great culture starts from within, often by constant collaboration, and extends outside of the office and work hours.

What brands and companies do you admire and why?

Patagonia is the first company that immediately came to mind when I thought of companies that I admire. Maybe this is because I’m from Oregon and grew up basically in the forest, but Patagonia has been doing sustainability way before sustainability was a buzzword. An even bigger buzzword than sustainability is authenticity, and Patagonia is an authentic brand in my eyes. The same messages and processes that they stood by in the 1990s are the same that they stand by in 2019 and that’s honorable to me. A modern-day company that I believe is also trying to achieve this is Everlane. Everlane is a trend-setting company in that they have started an important conversation surrounding transparency that has led other brands to follow suit. This topic definitely was not as prevalent when I was growing up, and it’s crazy to think that the current generation will grow up in a time where topics such as sustainability, authenticity, and transparency are at the forefront.

What do you do to stay sharp and improve your craft?

I am a firm believer in consuming whatever you want to be good at. Musicians should listen to a lot of music, dancers should attend a lot of dance performances, filmmakers should watch a lot of movies. While of course I studied graphic design in school and spent my academic life in classes all day designing books and honing that craft, my professional life was spent at editorial internships and publishing companies, learning what school couldn’t teach me about books and book design. In my free time, I visit bookstores, not only because I really like to read, but because I wanted to familiarize myself with book designers and publishing companies that I had never heard of. To say my whole life revolves around books would be an understatement! I cannot stop consuming books in every form, and I believe this makes me a good book designer. I also jump at any opportunity to help a friend, even if they can’t pay me, if it means I can practice design. I’ve designed promotional posters for drag queen friends, calligraphed envelopes for a friend’s sister’s wedding, and created business cards for a classmate trying to find a job.

What’s your favorite quote?

A quote that I really love is, “You don’t start out a project to create a failure or success.” This was said in an interview with Irma Boom and I resonate with it for a number of reasons. To me, this is the less cheesy version of the “life is a journey, not a destination” quote. While being result or outcome-focused might get you to the destination faster, what is there really to learn from a process based on this ideal? I have learned to embrace my absolute flops as much as I embrace my triumphs. A few years ago, I began a really difficult coding project that I absolutely did not have the skill or knowledge to ever complete, which I knew before even starting it. But, my professor at the time gave me no other option and I was forced (lovingly) to “complete” the project without cutting corners. As you’ve probably guessed, I wasn’t able to finish the project, and ended up troubleshooting the same few lines of code for over a week with no success. I remember being so bummed out; I let my teacher down, I didn’t have a completed website to show to the class or upload to my portfolio, and it was driving me insane that I never did figure out how to fix the code problem that I kept running into. But when I look back on this project, what I can see now is all the skills that I DID learn, and how much better I got at coding even if I didn’t master the skill I set out to master. Just like Irma Boom said, I definitely didn’t set out to create failure or success with this project. What I gained from this wasn’t as concrete as a “failure” or “success,” but, organically, a better understanding of code and also my own willpower.

10. If you could solve one problem in the world what would it be?

What's the most courageous thing you've ever done?

How are creativity and innovation related?

Why do companies need clarity and creativity?

You have 30 minutes of free time. What do you do with it?

What is one risky and bold goal in life you have? Or, if you could dedicate your life to solving one problem, what would it be?

Explain your creative process

What is the best advice that you have been given?

What is your definition of creativity?

What 10 songs are on your favorite playlist right now?

How do you want people to remember you?

Have you been convicted of a crime and/or a felony? If so, what was the offense? State the city, country, and date.

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