Amy Lima

Product Designer
NYC
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Bio

Growing up, I always had trouble coloring inside the lines; in the literal sense, but in most other walks of life, too. I’m a delicate balance of paradoxes and driven by passion, and have found that the two compliment each other. I’m a poet who went on to study economics and eventually work in the music industry. I’m a first-generation American born to Latin parents, and found myself rooted in a third continent (Europe) post-graduation, undertaking the immigrant experience myself. I now find myself at a similar and familiar turning point: in my late 20’s, completely enthralled by the exciting industry of design I want to give my everything to. I’m fascinated by new ideas, solving problems, and connecting with people on a fundamental level. I use my wonder with the breadth and details of the world to propel myself deeper than most others are willing to go - constantly challenging my own assumptions, exploring new (often intimidating) disciplines, and above all else, championing the thoughts and feelings of others as much as I can.

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Work Experience
Work Experience
West Orange
Work Experience
University
Past: New York University Present: Designlab
Skills
Languages: English, Portuguese (native), Spanish (advanced), German (intermediate), French (beginner). Awards: Diversify Design Scholarship, DubHacks Hackathon Winner Certificates (in progress): UX Design, Visual Design, Javascript, Digital Project Management As I'm still currently midway through my UX Design Bootcamp, my portfolio currently only includes one case study - over then next 2 months, I'll add another 3 projects to my site, showcasing a more comprehensive range of my design skills.
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Tell us why you're the best applicant in under 50 words

Multidisciplinary creative work is not simply something I wish to do fully and exceptionally, but something I truly love - and when those two driving forces meet, I make magic happen. I promise I’ll make your investment in my success worthwhile and be a WGI alum you’ll be proud of.

Give us your bio in under 500 words

Growing up, I always had trouble coloring inside the lines; in the literal sense, but in most other walks of life, too. I’m a delicate balance of paradoxes and driven by passion, and have found that the two compliment each other. I’m a poet who went on to study economics and eventually work in the music industry. I’m a first-generation American born to Latin parents, and found myself rooted in a third continent (Europe) post-graduation, undertaking the immigrant experience myself. I now find myself at a similar and familiar turning point: in my late 20’s, completely enthralled by the exciting industry of design I want to give my everything to. I’m fascinated by new ideas, solving problems, and connecting with people on a fundamental level. I use my wonder with the breadth and details of the world to propel myself deeper than most others are willing to go - constantly challenging my own assumptions, exploring new (often intimidating) disciplines, and above all else, championing the thoughts and feelings of others as much as I can.

1. What's the most courageous thing you've ever done?

Shortly after I graduated University, I backpacked alone around the world from Oceania to Europe, reignited my love affair with Berlin, and set up a life there from scratch for the next three and a half years. I had actually arrived in Berlin with a promising job prospect lined up, but for the first time in my early career, experienced an unsuccessful interview. I was devastated and, for at least a brief moment, admittedly directionless. Leaving would have been the easiest thing to do. I didn’t yet have any friends in the city, was even further away from speaking any German, and had the confidence in my abilities seriously shaken. But I’m the sole daughter to immigrant parents who endured infinitely more obstacles and setbacks under much more dire circumstances. For me, walking away wasn’t an option - I knew I would make my journey to Berlin a redemption story, even if I didn’t know exactly how yet. In the end, the journey challenged my creative range in many ways: from expanding a Brooklyn-based party series to three European cities, helping develop a biodegradable glitter company, and building community initiatives as well as an online and print journal for one of the city’s most influential independent record labels, I learned that my creativity can find a home in many spaces. Funny enough, I never considered this an act of bravery until other people brought it to my attention. For me, this was just another moment where I lived as authentically as I could, embracing meaningful challenges in my life as they presented themselves - something that I’m now thankful comes naturally to me.

2. How are creativity and innovation related?

I believe the two go hand in hand; creativity is where novel ideas are born, and innovation involves the actionable steps taken to bring those ideas to life, bridging the gap between imagination and reality.

3. Why do companies need clarity and creativity?

Aside from leading to innovation that puts you ahead of others in the industry with significant profit returns, clarity and creativity in the workplace empowers employees to deeply invest in and identify with the company’s mission, creating a more cohesive, growth-orientated team.

4. You have 30 minutes of free time. What do you do with it?

Although I keep very busy, I’ve learned through experience that existing in a constant state of hyper-productivity is the surest way to burn out, or worse, lose all passion for what you’re doing; with this, I try to be mindful and allow myself to enjoy free time without the pressure of producing some output. When I have a rare moment of quiet, my subconscious inspiration usually surfaces, most often in the form of short-prose poetry. More often, however, I take the time to call my family. With the exception of my parents, my entire family is a continent away in Brazil, and save our annual Christmas trip below the equator, that distance is always sorely felt. With the important people in my life now stretched out even further from Europe to Australia, there’s always someone I’m missing, working hard to make proud, and could use a reaching out to. So those extra 30 minutes are usually spent sending a photo, song, voice note, or text message to the people I never want to become too busy to lose touch with.

5. What is one risky and bold goal in life you have? Or, if you could dedicate your life to solving one problem, what would it be?

I believe life is all about evolution, from your pursuits to your goals, so there are very few lifelong goals I’ve held onto, but one of them remains unwavering: writing a book one day. The imaginary genre has changed over the years - first a novel, once a poetry anthology - but lately has begged to come to life as a biographical account of my father’s journey to America in all its inglorious grit and perseverance. If I let myself go even bolder, I’ll ultimately adapt it into a screenplay. I even have the title and soundtrack worked out. The Stories You Keep: coming [one day] to a bookstore and big screen near you.

6. Explain your creative process

In order for my creativity to be authentic, I need to be inspired. For me, inspiration can take many forms: an idea, a word, a person’s fight for something. Once I find a concept I can latch myself onto and relate to on a deeper level, I can then wholeheartedly champion it, and this is when my creativity comes most alive. In order to tap into the full breadth of my creativity, I need to reach a place of complete stillness where I can quickly conceptualize how this creativity will manifest, and once I have a few strong contending ideas to work with, I’ll start putting the pen to paper with sketches or outlines to give it life. In the case of coming up with a product concept for my first hackathon, this process looked something like this: - I took some days to read through the various problem statement prompts given to participants, paying attention to the words that stuck out to me the most. It didn’t happen right away, but eventually one word struck a chord with me: “inaccessibility.” - I started thinking about what this word meant to me, and what implications it has in the world of design. I’m particularly passionate about web accessibility for those with disabilities and limited web access, so that became the cause I would try to fight for. - On a drive home from the supermarket, I felt some ideas on the forefront of my mind desperate to jump out, but muffled by the noise I was existing in: music blasting, running through errands, thinking of the next item to cross off the to-do list. I shut everything off and sat with myself for a few moments as I shuffled through ideas in my mind like slides on a deck. One idea in particular - a tool that could auto-generate alt-text so that those with screen readers need not rely on hand-written alt text - stood out above the rest. Time to put it to paper. - Once I started outlining how this tool could work, I realized it could serve for a second use case: transcribing video streams, which would serve people with low bandwidth who rely on video-based information, such as students in the virtual learning environment. This was the initial framework that guided my team to ultimately win the “Best Use of Azure for Social Good” category.

7. What is the best advice that you have been given?

“Don’t measure your life by the level of individual prominence you have achieved, but by the individuals you have helped become better people.” A very close second: “Close that tab, beloved. You’re not going to read it later.”

8. What is your definition of creativity?

Setting your soul on fire.

9. What 10 songs are on your favorite playlist right now?

Ghost Town - Wurld Criançada - Nikola Cruz Safety net - Ariana Grande Cayendo (accousting) - Frank Ocean Nterini - Fatoumata Diawara Pull Up - Blanco Best Bad Influence - Dounia La Noche de Anoche - Bad Bunny Balade Brésilienne - Gaël Faye Mona Ki Ngi Xica - Bonga

10. How do you want people to remember you?

A friend they’ve always had, but only just happened to meet for the first time.

Passport is valid for next 12 months

Yes

Which country issued your passport?

United States, Brazil

Have you been convicted of a crime and/or a felony? If so, what was the offense? State the city, country, and date.

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